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An important piece of history donated by Crown Princess Mette-Marit


An important piece of history donated by Crown Princess Mette-Marit

Fotos: Mona Lindseth

NEW YORK/USA: Thursday October 8th HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway gave a piece of the original tapestry of the UN Security Council Chamber as a gift to Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s permanent collection in New York.

Thursday October 8th Security Council Chamber as a gift to Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s permanent collection in New  York.  , HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway gave a piece of the original tapestry of the UN Foto:

Thursday October 8th
Security Council Chamber as a gift to Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s permanent collection in New
York.
, HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway gave a piece of the original tapestry of the UN Foto: Mona Lindseth

Poulsson’s design has covered the walls of the Security Council Chambers since the opening in 1952 until the renovation in 2013. In that period, it has witnessed some of the most important political debates in modern history from the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, to Secretary of State Colin Powell’s speech before the Iraq War in 2003 and several vetos on Syria in recent years.

Thursday the backdrop of history became a part of history itself, by entering the permanent collection of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York. In a ceremony at the museum, HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit gave the tapestry to Caroline Baumann, Director at Cooper Hewitt.

Inscriptions of peace

– As the most important design museum in the US, you are the bearers and keepers of design history. We are proud that today the textile by Else Poulsson becomes a part of your permanent collection alongside work by the world’s most influential designers, says HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit.

The renowned modernist Norwegian architect Arnstein Arneberg designed the Security Council Chamber with an architectural framework and design features that convey messages of peace, justice and democracy. In Else Poulssons blue tapestry, symbols of faith, hope an charity are found in the motifs of anchors, growing wheat and hearts.

– When we think back on the early aspirations of the UN and how the headquarters in New York has influenced the world – these first inscriptions of peace into the very fabric of the walls of the Security Council Chamber are very moving, says HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit.

Excellent work of design and manufacture

Crown Princess Mette-Marit in conversation with director Caroline Baumann at Cooper Hewitt.

Crown Princess Mette-Marit in conversation with director Caroline Baumann at Cooper Hewitt. Foto: Mona Lindseth

The gift to Cooper Hewitt is the only existing piece of the original wallcovering, made by Joh. Petersen AS in Oslo Norway.

– The textile is among the most culturally significant gifts to the Cooper Hewitt Collection and is itself an excellent work of design and manufacture, says Caroline Baumann, Director at Cooper Hewitt.

– This extraordinary gift represents the best of this century’s Norwegian Design.

, HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway gave a piece of the original tapestry of the UN

Poulsson’s textile will join the museum’s collection of 210 000 design objects that spans ten centuries, including over 60 objects from Norway.

Else Poulsson

Textile, 1951. Designed by Else Poulsson (Norwegian, 1909–2002). Made by Joh. Petersen AS (Oslo, Norway,  1882–1976). Rayon satin damask weave. 24.1 × 55.9 cm   (9 1/2 in. × 22 in.). Gift of the Petersen family and the Royal  Norwegian Consulate General, 2015-12-1.

Textile, 1951. Designed by Else Poulsson
(Norwegian, 1909–2002).
Made by Joh. Petersen AS (Oslo, Norway,
1882–1976).
Rayon satin damask weave. 24.1 × 55.9 cm
(9 1/2 in. × 22 in.).
Gift of the Petersen family and the Royal
Norwegian Consulate General, 2015-12-1.

Else Poulsson was one of the most important figures on the Norwegian textile art scene, creating textiles with detailed embroidery in some of Norway ́s most exquisite royal and political chambers. Among her most recognized works is her collaboration with Arnstein Arneberg on the design of Oslo City Hall, where she created the centerpiece of the Council Chambers as well as other textiles. Poulsson worked as an artist her whole life until she passed away in 2002, 92 years old.

 

FACTS

What: Ceremony to celebrate the gift of a Norwegian textile to Cooper Hewitt’s wallcoverings collection. The original wallpaper is from the United Nations Security Chamber, donated to the UN in 1952. Thursday, October 8th at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Who Their Royal Highnesses Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway

Caroline Baumann, Director, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

HE Ambassador of Norway to the U.S, Kåre Aas

HE Ambassador of Norway to the UN, Geir O. Pedersen

Consul General of Norway in New York, Elin Bergithe Rognlie

Textile, 1951
. Designed by Else Poulsson, (Norwegian, 1909–2002). Made by Joh. Petersen AS (Oslo, Norway, 1882–1976).

Rayon satin damask weave. 24.1 × 55.9 cm, (9 1/2 in. × 22 in.).

Gift of the Petersen family and the Royal Norwegian Consulate General, 2015-12-1.

Security Council Chambers 


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